Every wine has a correct glass to use for drinking it. Here are some tips and ideas:

  • Clear glasses are the best, they allow one to appreciate and enjoy the wines colour.
  • Glasses that taper to the rim will capture the wines bouquet.
  • Very important! Don’t fill glasses to more than two thirds of their volume, even better do fill it just over one third full. The reason for that is that wine can become very hot or that you will lose the bouquet very quickly.
  • Use flutes for Champagne and for Sparkling wines. Normal glasses will lose the sparkle and bouquet very quickly.
  • On temperature, never over chill fine white wines (under 3ºC). It will destroy the flavour.
  • Serve Champagne and Sparkling Wines well chilled (5-7ºC) A good tip here is to have halve ice and then ad some water to the ice bucket. It will keep the Champagne and Sparkling wine nicely chilled because there is nothing worse than warm bubbly.
  • Serve white wines chilled (6-8ºC).
  • Red wines are traditionally served at room temperature, but be aware of a really hot climate. When a wine is too hot, all you will taste, is the alcohol and no fruit, no elegance, no structure. At lunch time or warm evenings I recommend you chill your wines slightly (10-12ºC). It is best to have your fine red wines at 15ºC and not more than 18ºC.

No rules, just the way you enjoy it.

Wine should be enjoyed in a relaxed manner. If you like to drink your wine as cold as possible, then go ahead and add ice cubes to your glass as many South Africans do. If you want to add soda water then do it. Wine should be served in a way that is most enjoyable to you, and not according to other’s rules. But if you want to experience the whole complexity of the wine, then you will of course not do it.

  • Here’s a little tip: Why don’t you freeze the left over wines in little ice cube trays and use it next time you are doing some cooking and need some wine stock. This way, you don’t throw wine away and add lots of flavour to the cooking process. Or, otherwise….just drink the wine that is left over!
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